New Jersey Devils: Waiting For Timo Meier Is The Hardest Part

San Jose Sharks right wing Timo Meier (28): James Guillory-USA TODAY Sports
San Jose Sharks right wing Timo Meier (28): James Guillory-USA TODAY Sports /
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The New Jersey Devils are coming off a huge win against the Philadelphia Flyers on Saturday night. On a night the Devils celebrated the 20th anniversary of the 2003 Stanley Cup Championship, they beat the Philadelphia Flyers 7-0. It was a great night to be in the building.

However, no Devils fan is talking about the game. All we can talk about is Timo Meier. The San Jose Sharks forward hasn’t even played a game since February 18th, but he is the talk of the hockey community. On Sunday, there were serious updates to the negotiations, as it seems teams have fallen out of the race.

The Winnipeg Jets went after forward Nino Niederreiter, which leaves them with just $1.24 million in cap space. The Vegas Golden Knights were the closest to the negotiations, but they went after St. Louis Blues forward Ivan Barbashev. Meanwhile, the Carolina Hurricanes were the other contenders, but they are reportedly out of the running.

That leaves the Devils, right? We’re just waiting for it to go through.

We’ve seen time and time again, the favorite doesn’t always get the star player. The Devils just dealt with this a few months ago with the free agency of Johnny Gaudreau. The Devils were by far the favorite, but out of nowhere, the Columbus Blue Jackets won the sweepstakes.

That’s why Sunday has been stressful for Devils fans. Are they the most likely to win the sweepstakes? Sure. Does that make it a formality? Absolutely not.

Next. 3 Bold Timo Meier Trade Proposals. dark

Patience is a virtue, but it’s one Devils fans do not have at this point. If the Devils get Timo Meier, they are actually a contender to win it all. Right now, it’s hard to say that. So, there is a lot on the line. However, fans have to be patient. Let it all work out. Tom Fitzgerald has shown he will make the right moves. As Josh Harris and David Blitzer know, sometimes you have to trust the process.